Hood alumnus begins new job at World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

Brad GoodmanBrad Goodman, an alumnus of Hood College’s Masters in Environmental Biology program, recently started a position with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in Washington DC. Brad graduated from the University of Delaware in 2008 with a B.A. in History, which he says was his favorite subject.

After graduation Brad served in the Peace Corps from 2008–10 and again in 2012. In the entire time he was with the Corps, he served in the Andes Mounts in Peru. He has this to say about that experience- “In addition to assisting local governments, villagers, and non-profits in implementing projects that increased local quality of life while preserving the environment, I was extremely lucky to live in a fantastically beautiful area at 12,000 feet above sea level. Seeing the great work being accomplished in conditions that were not always ideal, usually by very inspiring locals and Peace Corps volunteers, I became hooked. From that point on I decided my work in the environmental sector should turn into a career.

He tells us a more about his Hood experience and career goals.

Why did you choose Hood?
I chose the Environmental Biology Master’s program at Hood because it is a very flexible program in terms of the courses you can take. It is also the only program I could find in the Mid-Atlantic that accepted students who didn’t have a major in science or who were looking to change careers. The location close to Washington, DC and to home in Delaware also helped.

What did you enjoy most about your time at Hood?
Honestly, I had no idea where Frederick, Maryland even was when I applied. However, the more I got to know the downtown area and its cafes (especially the cafes!), the more I appreciated the beauty and surprising liveliness of the town. I really enjoyed taking a break to walk around Frederick, especially during the fall time of the year.

What project did you work on while at Hood?
I did a final project while working for Frederick County Government’s Office of Sustainability and Environmental Resources. There I helped develop the County’s first watershed restoration plan. My focus was on identifying management practices that lowered the total count of E. coli bacteria in waterways and on calculating the change in counts with these practices.

How did your experience at Hood contribute towards landing the position at WWF?
The hiring team told me that the most important thing is that the candidate demonstrates a passion and understanding of conservation work, since that is an indicator of someone who will be happy and work towards World Wildlife Fund’s goals. My Master’s degree demonstrated this, as it helped me understand the projects being done with WWF and shows my long-term commitment to conservation and sustainable development.

Tell us a little about your new position
As Project Coordinator, I’ll be assisting grantees and consultants in processing their project proposals for WWF. This is a great opportunity for me to learn about the many projects going on in all goal areas (such as climate, forests, food, etc.) and regions (Latin American and Caribbean, Africa, etc.). It is also a great opportunity to meet the many inspiring people working to protect wildlife and to promote a better way of living for human beings.