Graduate School Highlights

More Than Just Molding Clay!

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Participants in Hood College’s Graduate Ceramics Arts programs have several degree options, but all students are working with both theory and practice in ceramics. Whether they are working towards a Ceramic Arts Certificate, Masters of Arts (M.A.), or Masters of Fine Arts (MFA), students develop their own style and point of view. Several exhibited over the summer, each showing different techniques.

IMG_0196 smallJanet Greer earned an M.A. this summer, and created an exhibition called “Mudpies and Monsters”. A grandmother, Greer chose to feature ideas from her imagination and from the work of six of her grandchildren. She created both functional and decorative pieces using mostly porcelain clay in electric, wood, soda, and Raku firings.

IMG_0250 small“Surviving Fire” by Ryan McGlone showed ceramic canteens faced with images of war. An art teacher who works with disabled children, McGlone chose to “show the survival and emotion of war in the mind, heart, and soul” in this exhibition, moving to a more serious and emotional perspective.

MFA recipient Joseph Delphia’s exhibition was titled “A Tactile Vision.” Joe is a functional artist and ceramics teacher who “hopes that his pots become objects that spend more time in a hand than on a shelf”. His work is fired in a wood-burning kiln, which creates color and texture through marks of the ash and flame.

Dawn Lovell’s exhibition was titled “Glazes, You Rock!”. As the title suggests, Lovell used a variety of glazes to create pieces with different textures and colors to show a variety of natural-looking works.

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Why the Humanities?

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DebarbaThe Graduate School at Hood College takes pride in its diversity…of people and programs. One such program is the Master of Arts in Humanities. Many students credit the program’s interdisciplinary focus for their increase in both analytical and big-picture thinking. One such student is Robert DeBarba, who started the program in fall of 2016.

A 2015 graduate of Mount St. Mary’s University with a Bachelor of Arts in History, Robert stayed in Maryland and began work as a government contractor. When looking to continue his education, he chose the Hood Humanities program because he “really liked how the Humanities program was tailored to personal interests of study and offered a well-rounded variety of coursework.” A year into the program, he credits it with helping advance his career due to his increased ability to analyze, interpret, and articulate abstract concepts. He describes the program as a ‘skill set’ degree that has provided him with a unique combination of analytical tools in a very technical field. After receiving his Master’s, Robert intends to continue his education with a Ph.D. and would like to become a teacher.

Hood Alum receives Department of Defense’s highest civilian award

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BerstAward2 (1) Kathleen Berst, a 2017 graduate of Hood College’s MBA program, has been awarded the “Department of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service Award,” the highest award given to career civilian employees of the US Department of Defense. It is given to “those employees whose careers reflect exceptional devotion to duty and whose contributions are of a significant value when it comes to the efficiency, economy or other improvements in Department of Defense (DoD).” Kathleen received the award for leading the Medical Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Facility, and ultimately for her recommendation that it be terminated. This challenging recommendation and her efforts resulted in over one billion dollars of savings and cost avoidance for the DoD. Kathleen was recognized at the Pentagon Annual Award Ceremony, and her importance can especially be seen in the words of Deputy Defense Secretary Bob Work, “You bring honor to the tradition of the civilian workforce and public service. Your dedication strengthens our country’s security and prosperity.”

Her professional journey took Kathleen from a biologist in army labs to being an Assistant Vaccine Manager in the Joint Vaccine Acquisition Program (JVAP), and ultimately to Project Manager for the Medical Countermeasure Test and Evaluation Facility and her current role as Deputy Commander of Acquisition for the US Army Medical Material Development Activity (USAMMDA). While a biologist, Kathleen realized she did not want to work in a lab for the rest of her life, and that earning her MBA would allow her to continue using her scientific knowledge in another setting. She started her MBA in 2000, and the experience was impactful on her and her career. “Just starting my MBA courses changed everything. The more I learned in my courses, the more questions I asked at work.” This helped make additional connections, which eventually resulted in Kathleen’s first management role in 2001. “Most of what I was learning in my MBA courses was directly applicable to my new job.  It was perfect! I was flying through my program and advancing at work.

Kathleen’s story does have a twist. Two classes before wrapping up her program, she found out she was pregnant with her first child. Due to complications and a new work position, she delayed degree completion. Soon enough, Kathleen changed positions and saw how her MBA knowledge was contributing to her career. “My career was blossoming because of what I had learned in my MBA program but my successful career had become a giant barrier that was preventing me from completing my MBA!” After speaking at Hood’s “Project Management” class in 2015, Kathleen’s desire to finish her MBA was revived. With the assistance of Dr. David Gurzick, she reenrolled and completed in 2017.

Her message to all is to “GET STARTED, ASK FOR HELP, AND KEEP LEARNING!” While many people are afraid to start or are terrified of failure, the solution is to “just move”. She emphasizes that asking for help is one of the best ways of figuring your career choices. “Most people will be willing to share what worked and what didn’t work. I have a handful of mentors and coaches with different strengths, so I look to them for guidance in different aspects of life and work.”

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Become a Reading Specialist By Doing It!

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In the Hood College Master’s in Reading Specialization program, two of the final steps are EDUC 524 and 525, Advanced Clinical Reading Experiences. Familiarly known as ‘clinic’, these two classes come together as a rigorous six-week summer program where participants act as reading specialists. It is an intense time, with the participants doing everything from assessing their students, creating plans to teach them based on their needs, and even observing and coaching each other. Program director Ellen Koitz explains that it is a chance for graduate students to apply the skills they’ve learned throughout the program, as well as for local elementary and secondary students to really learn over the summer. Hood’s emphasis on hands-on application and real-life experience shines, as participants create and follow through with plans tailored to real students and peers. Megan Ramsburg, a teacher at FCPS’ Whittier Elementary School, explains that “if I start a career as a literacy specialist, I now already have some experience with what it will be like”.

Something that sets Hood’s program apart is the focus on a variety of ages. The certification gained through the program is for K-12, so participants work with both elementary and secondary students. This means that elementary school teachers will work with high school students, and vice versa. For three weeks, participants work with elementary students, all of whom are identified as reading at least a year below their grade levels. For the three weeks with secondary students, the focus is on content area reading and study skills. 2017 participant Rachel Crane, a teacher for Washington County Public Schools states, “you get experience with a variety of age groups and needs that it’s almost impossible to get in your regular career”.

Another advantage to the program is timing. With clinic occurring during the summer, students don’t need to take a leave of absence from their regular jobs or try to cram hours in around other teaching. Clinic participants are either ready to graduate or need just one more class, and once their program portfolios are submitted they will gain their certification. While the group agrees that they are ready to be done and graduate, they also praise the program for pushing them and preparing them for a variety of situations and career choices.

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Ceramics Program Intensive Summer Seminars

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Hood College Ceramics students haven’t just been relaxing this summer! They have had the option of taking several short but intensive seminar classes. Two of these 5-day classes included Throwing Large Forms (ARTS 509) and Salt/Soda Surfaces and Firing (ARTS 599MM).

Taught by visiting artist Kevin Crowe, Throwing Large Farms explored creating large-scale pots using “method…not machismo”, as explained by the instructor. Requiring throwing skills, imagination, and sense of humor, participants were able to explore using techniques to create pieces on a grand scale!

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Salt/Soda Surfaces and Firing, taught by visiting artist Cathi Jefferson, gave students the uncommon opportunity to explore ways to create variations in the surfaces and firing of their work using these techniques. Experimenting, they were able to create beautiful effects in a variety of ways!    

Photographs by Steven Luttrell and Emily Bernstein

Plant by Plant towards Preservation of Monarchs – John Maciolek’s inspirational story

Posted by | Environmental Biology, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

 

john 3John “Monarch” Maciolek, a 2017 Hood College graduate in the Environment Biology program, has single-handedly been advocating for a monarch butterfly habitat in the newly-opened Hood-Frederick Memorial Hospital Resource Garden since its inception this spring. John’s assistance with the garden has been invaluable. He has not only donated his free time and effort, but milkweed plants from his property, all to develop an environment friendly to the monarch butterfly. The milkweed is the only plant in which the monarch can lay their eggs, and as the monarch’s natural habitats are being destroyed, the preservation of milkweed is crucial.

According to John, three species of milkweeds are planted in the Garden; Common Milkweed, Butterflyweed and Swamp Milkweed, with future plans for at least five different species. What makes this project even more notable is the fact that there are pollinator plants in close proximity to Milkweeds, so the butterflies will have food at the same spot. John believes that the garden is “a great educational tool that can be used as a resource for a number of Hood classes, like Environmental Problems, Insect Ecology and Conservation Biology.”

John started his Masters in Environmental Biology after several years in the Bioinformatics field. His career transition inspired him to develop plans for opening a nursery which would focus on native plants and their preservation, as well as establishing a non-profit which would work to purchase and preserve land before it is sold for large developments. “There are so many ways of developing infrastructure without having sprawl. I am not anti-business, just anti-sprawl.”

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While working toward these career goals, John will continue overseeing Hood’s Monarch Garden, which has been endorsed by both Monarch Watch and the Xerces Society.  John encourages anyone who is interested in helping these beautiful butterflies to volunteer with the Hood-FMH Resource Garden.

Outstanding Student- Environmental Biology

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Curtis Rogeri-jpCrsC6-Ls is the recipient of the 2017 Outstanding Environmental Biology Student award.  While enrolled in Hood College’s ENV Master’s program, Curtis was given the opportunity to work on a USDA-APHIS grant analyzing the effects of insect growth regulators on a honeybee pest, the small hive beetle. He presented his findings at both the Mid-Atlantic Ecological Society of America regional meeting, and at the National ESA meeting, as well as to a group of notable Korean visiting scientists.  As a direct result of his academic work at Hood, Curtis is employed by the USDA Bee Research Lab to assist in researching honeybee physiology, nutrition, and the various pests that continue to plague them.  He is working on preparing the findings of his thesis on small hive beetles for publication and hopes to get at least two journal articles out of the endeavor.

 

Outstanding Student- Biomedical Science

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Bagni Elizabeth “Lizzy” Terrell began the Hood College Master’s in Biomedical Science program in the fall of 2013 and is a truly exemplary student and classroom leader. When speaking of Lizzy’s work on her thesis project, her NCI mentor, Dr. Susan Morrison states:  “Lizzy Terrell is one of the most talented young scientists that I have had the privilege to work with.  She is bright, articulate, and sets high standards for herself both in the quality of her work and in her thinking about scientific problems.  She embarks on a research career with outstanding potential.”  The BMS Faculty at Hood concur and look forward to reading the great scientific advances Lizzy will make throughout her career.  Lizzy also the won Hood’s Three-Minute Thesis Competition.

 

Become a (Better) Leader with Hood’s Doctoral Program!

Posted by | Business Administration, Doctorates, Educational Leadership, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

bandsDid you know that Hood has a doctoral program in Organizational Leadership? Learn all about it directly from Kathleen Bands, the director of the program, on our brand new YouTube channel!

Meet Kathleen Bands

Hear her describe the program, which offers degree options in educational leadership (D.O.L.) and business administration (D.B.A.). Working with a cohort of peers from various backgrounds, doctoral candidates learn from coursework and practical experience that will help as they pursue their individual goals. Current students include school principals, researchers, human resources directors, and project managers. Several have undergraduate and/or graduate degrees from Hood, and aim to become the colleges’ first “Three Degree” graduates! Learn more about Dr. Bands and the program in the above video, as well as on our website (Hood Graduate School Doctoral Program).

Don’t forget to subscribe to the Graduate School’s brand new YouTube channel!

Never Giving Up On the Dream of a Degree

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TraciPic1Traci Holland, Associate Registrar for Graduate Studies, came to Hood College in 2002.  She began as Administrative Assistant to the Graduate Dean, then moved to the undergraduate admission office, where she managed the inquiry and application files for thousands of prospective students.  While working full-time, Traci completed her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology in 2007, often working or attending classes late into the evenings.  She is the first person in her family to earn a college degree.

In 2007, Traci moved back to the Graduate School as a Records Specialist, managing graduate student records from inquiry through to graduation.  Under the mentorship of then-Graduate School Dean Dr. Kathleen Bands, she streamlined processes, developed marketing and recruitment plans for every graduate program and oversaw general operations of the office, becoming Coordinator of Graduate Admissions in 2008. She earned her Master of Arts program in Human Sciences in 2010, winning the program’s Outstanding Student Award. Along with the degree came a promotion to Director of Graduate Admissions.  When the Registrar functions of graduate admissions were moved to the Registrar’s office in January 2015, Traci moved with them.  She continues to update processes between undergraduate and graduate student records management and is the go-to person for approximately 1000 graduate students.

In May 2016, Traci led her colleagues in establishing by-laws for the newly formed Staff Council.  In November, she was elected to represent the Academic Affairs Division on the Staff Council Board, and further elected as the council’s Vice-Chair.  As Vice-Chair, Traci heads the standing Nominating Committee of the Staff Council and represents staff issues as a voting member of the College’s Planning, Budgeting and Assessment Committee.  December saw Traci heading the holiday party planning committee and beginning the tradition of pairing a local charity with the event. Hood faculty and staff donated a truckload of food, clothing, toiletries, and various other sundries to the Frederick Rescue Mission.

In May 2017, the Graduate School honored Traci with the “Excellence in Service – Outstanding Staff Award for her efforts and performance supporting the Graduate School. She was nominated by a unanimous vote of the Graduate School staff, and Graduate Dean Dr. April Boulton said, “Given Traci’s long tenure in the Grad School prior to her move to the Registrar’s Office, we have turned to her again and again and again.  She has often been our “go to” on historical process, standard operating procedures, and so much more—she undeniably deserved the award.”

Traci knew when she began working at Hood that she was on the right career path.  “Having an education has always been so important to me.  I worked on my bachelor’s degree in bits and pieces from 1990 to 2007, never giving up on that dream.  It is a blessing every day that I can observe our students pursue that same dream.  I have been through many of the challenges and struggles that they have which allows me to be empathetic and supportive.  Commencement day is the proudest day for me as I watch those same students, who came to me nervous and uncertain, bounce across that stage with a profound sense of accomplishment.”