Graduate School Highlights

Hood College hosts Death Cafe – Frederick

Posted by | Graduate School Highlights, Thanatology | No Comments

death cafe

Hood College will host the 2017 edition of Death Cafe – Frederick, from 2 – 4 pm on Saturday May 6th in the Whitaker Center Commons.

Death Cafe is an international movement where people gather to eat cake, drink tea, and discuss death with the intention of increasing awareness so people make the most of their lives. It is a group directed discussion with no agenda, but not a grief support group or counseling session.

Last year’s Death Cafe recorded an impressive turnout. According to Kaili van Waveren, this year’s co-organizer, “I attended the event and was blown away by how eager people were to actually talk about death, and how supportive and validating people were to each other. Everyone I spoke with said that they were very impressed, and a number of the RSVPs I have received mentioned that they attended last year and were excited to participate in another Death Cafe.”

She added; “We believe that talking about death is important: mindfulness of one’s mortality can inspire rich and purposeful living. We also know that talking about death can be scary and sad and Death Cafe provides a supportive and fun environment in which people can discuss their fears and feelings. We hope that many students will join, but also see this as a service to community and a great opportunity for outreach.”

Attendees should expect a low-key and upbeat atmosphere in which they can talk about death and meet like-minded people while enjoying delicious baked goods!

Hood – A Place That Nurtured My Calling and Passion

Posted by | Doctorates, Educational Leadership, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

Lura_Hanks_WebHaving earned her undergraduate degree in Early Childhood Education and her Master’s in Educational Leadership from Hood College, Lura Hanks, a candidate in Hood’s initial Doctorate of Organizational Leadership (DOL) cohort, is on her way to becoming one of the college’s first “three degree” recipients.

Lura is currently Supervisor of Language Arts and Social Studies for Washington County (MD) Public Schools.  She provides professional development, curriculum design and resources to 48 schools, serving staff and students from PreK through 12th grade. She started her teaching career with Frederick County Public Schools at Middletown Elementary School before becoming an FCPS Teacher Specialist for English/Language Arts and Social Studies. Following Assistant Principal positions at Thurmont Primary and Elementary and Spring Ridge Elementary, she received her first Principal position at Mercersburg Elementary in the Tuscarora School District in Pennsylvania.  Lura returned to Maryland in 2013 to become Principal at Winter Street Elementary in Hagerstown before assuming her current position in 2015.  She has also served as a School Board Director in the Greencastle- Antrim (PA) School District.

Lura has been involved in a variety of projects to support technology initiatives and enrich students’ experiences at the elementary level, including the development of a program for students in grades 3-5 to demonstrate proficiency on grade level standards, work ethic and motivation, as well as exemplary character and behavior.  The program enabled students to enhance their general education through integrated studies in math, English, Science and Social Studies.

“Hood College has provided the foundation necessary for me to excel in the educational field.  With my own passion and drive to succeed, Hood continues to provide exceptional mentors and instructors that inspire, expect and support my own professional learning.  Through a liberal arts approach, Hood has enabled me to view the world from a global perspective and transfer those experiences to better prepare young students for the world they will lead.  Each experience at Hood has equipped me with the skills and knowledge to advance professionally with confidence and passion. 

As an educator, my goal is always to have the greatest impact in preparing our nation’s youth for success in the world we have created for them.  My hope is to inspire, expect and support success for as many children as I can influence.  Hood has nurtured my calling and I will continue to work for the health and wealth of our communities through advanced literacy competence and citizenship development in our future caretakers.”

Originally from Massachusetts, Lura is married to David Hanks, Assistant Principal at Northern Middle School in Hagerstown, and mother of Nathan (10) and Natalie (9).

Hood College Ceramic Arts students join with collectors in campus art exhibition

Posted by | Ceramics, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

Graduate students in Hood College’s ceramic arts programs recently participated in a campus exhibition, “Collectors’ Voices in Ceramic Art: A Leading Edge Exhibition.”  The students were enrolled in ARTS 543, History of Ceramic Arts and completed the exhibition as part of the class.  Students were paired with a regional art collector to research and present on collected ceramic artwork.

Professor Joyce Michaud, Hood’s Program Director for Ceramic Arts, had this to say about the exhibition.

How did you decide to stage this exhibition? 

Eric Serritella Tea potMarc Grainer, a member of our advisory proposed the exhibition and the advisory council voted in favor of its staging. The exhibition and the accompanying lectures are a part of our yearlong colloquium and is sponsored by the Humanities Council and Ceramic Arts Program.  ARTS 543 places special emphasis on broadening the knowledge and experience of students through personal involvement in researching and encountering historic work.  This exhibition brought together a breadth of ceramic history, especially in the up close and personal experience provided by our collectors, who welcomed students into their homes to talk about their collections and the motivations behind their collecting.  These people have knowledge and passion for ceramics, both contemporary and historic.

 

 

How did you decide on which pieces to display? 

Jenna Gianni, Director of the Galleries, and I, along with members of the advisory council, visited collector’s homes.  The collectors then honed in on a unique piece that they were willing to loan to Hood College for the month long exhibition.

How did the collections in this exhibition differ from the works showcased at prior exhibitions? 

The value of this exhibition was extremely high.  Being able to see these pieces in the beautiful Hood College Whitaker Gallery was a real treat.  The intermingling of historic and contemporary work in one gallery/exhibition was a rare experience.  The ages intermingling provided an eclectic conversation both human and ceramic.

What were the high points of the exhibition?

Collector and former Advisory Council member David Rehfuss wrote to a friend after attending the exhibition opening reception.  “I visited the Hood College Collectors Voices in Ceramic Arts: A Leading Edge Exhibition yesterday and was impressed. The array and diversity of the 22 ceramics there made for good viewing and good conversation between the visitors”.

 

What were the outcomes for the students that participated in this exhibition?

The students were exposed to a wide range of historic and contemporary ceramic art to which many had not yet been exposed.  Additionally, they developed personal relationships with the collectors, learning more about building and maintaining a collection, as well as the periods in the history of ceramic art with an emphasis on how ceramic arts fit into the contemporary art world.

Also, the students were brought into the real world of their own passions and career choices that may rely on the collectors to provide and support, including primary research and integrating the history of the work, the stories of the collecting, and the legacy that will last beyond the collectors themselves.

Are there plans to hold a similar exhibition soon? 

The 2018-2019 gallery calendar offers great opportunities for another exciting exhibition and the conversations have already begun!

Hood College Graduate School’s Human Sciences program undergoes name change

Posted by | Graduate School Highlights, Interdisciplinary Studies in Human Behavior (Previously Human Sciences) | No Comments

In 1971, Hood College’s Graduate School began with one program, the Master of Arts in Human Sciences. The program has had a variety of concentrations throughout the past 40+ years, including education, environmental biology, public affairs, nursing, counseling, special education, and management. To reflect its housing within the Psychology & Counseling Department, as well as the interdisciplinary approach of the curriculum, the program has been renamed “Interdisciplinary Studies in Human Behavior”.

Many of Hood’s current graduate programs started out as tracks of the degree, as it was initially developed for the human service occupations.

According to Dr. Jason Trent, Director of the program, “The decision to change the name of the program came after careful consideration by faculty of the Psychology & Counseling department in order to better reflect its current curriculum and focus.  Not only will this better reflect what the program has emphasized for the past several years, but it is also more descriptive. A variety of people have asked, ‘What is Human Sciences?’, and we believe this ambiguity may hinder the success of our students after graduating. Changing the name to Interdisciplinary Studies in Human Behavior will make it clearer to potential students and to potential employers of former students as to what this degree offers.”

Visit the Interdisciplinary Studies in Human Behavior program website for more information.

Effective Leadership Makes the Difference

Posted by | Educational Leadership, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

Roger's PhotoRoger Stenersen, Program Director for Hood College’s Educational Leadership Program, has devoted his life to education and teacher preparation.  A Baltimore County native, Roger attended St. Paul’s School in Broolandville and earned his Bachelor of Arts in History of English Literature and teacher certification at Washington College. He completed his Master’s Degree in Administration and Supervision at Salisbury State University.  He also took additional graduate coursework in the University of Maryland’s field doctoral program partnership with Washington County Public Schools.

Following graduation from Washington, Roger taught at the high school in Kent County, MD, where he also coached lacrosse and wrestling.  In 1978 he moved to Washington County, where he worked in school-based administration for twenty-six years.  His professional roles included assistant principal appointments in three middle schools and principal appointments in four.  Following his retirement, he was an instructor in Towson University’s Department of Instructional Leadership and Professional Development where he taught courses in Leadership Theory and Practice, Leadership of the Schools, Supervision, and Group Dynamics. He has also supervised dozens of educational leadership interns in Baltimore, Carroll, Prince George’s, Montgomery, Washington and Frederick counties.

An area of special interest to Roger is the professional development of school leaders, and he has earned NAESP certification as a mentor to beginning principals.  One of four members of the team which developed Hood’s new Doctoral Program in Organizational Leadership, he sees this as a wonderful opportunity – not just for school personnel, but for all community leaders – to take their leadership to the next level and benefit the greater Frederick region.

 

Hood College Master of Fine Arts in Ceramics candidate featured in campus exhibition

Posted by | Ceramics, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

PR PicMeg Lau is a Hood College Master of Fine Arts in Ceramics candidate who will be exhibiting on campus this April as part of her thesis.  “The Past is Present” will run from April 12 to 30 at the Whitaker Campus Center Gallery. Meg will also present a gallery talk and host an opening reception scheduled April 14from 4:30 to 7 p.m. The on display at the exhibition include large smoke fired urns ranging from sixteen to thirty-two inches tall and smaller urn forms ranging from six to twelve inches, all created for the containment of personal and communal memories of loved ones. They all have the physical potential to contain relics, memorabilia, or cremation ashes for one or more family members.  The urns celebrate the past and, will be cherished in the future. The exhibition speaks to the history of ceramics and the relationships that have existed between women, family, spirituality and the vessel. The urns in this exhibit represent life, both past and present.

Meg shares her Hood experience with us below.

Background

Meg is from Strasburg, Pennsylvania and teaches high school ceramics in the Lampeter-Strasburg School District.  She earned her Bachelor of Science in Art Education from Millersville University and her Master’s in Art Education from Kutztown University. She will complete her Masters of Fine Arts in Ceramic Arts this spring at Hood.

Hood College experience

My experience at Hood has been amazing.  The MFA Ceramic Arts program is very holistic, as it offers students a very strong foundation for technique, aesthetics, history, critical analysis, as well as marketing strategies for the artist.  Additionally, this program has allowed me to meet other artists/students from all over the country.  We have been able to work with one another collaboratively using Hood’s fabulous facilities.

Hood 145

Impact of the MFA program on your career

As a teacher I have had the opportunity to bring to my students everything that this program has given to me. Professor Joyce Michaud and all of the teachers at Hood have modeled such dedication to their students, which has allowed me to bring an abundant amount of technical, historical and critical knowledge directly back to my classroom.

Sources of inspiration

I am inspired by the history of ceramics as well as by my family.

From Insect Ecology to Academic Leadership – Hood College’s Graduate Dean

Posted by | Environmental Biology, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

aprilheadDr. April M. Boulton, Interim Dean of Hood College’s Graduate School and Associate Professor of Biology, came to the college in 2006 as an instructor.  She became Director of the Environmental Biology (ENV) master’s program and assistant professor of biology in 2009.  She was then appointed as the Associate Dean of the Graduate School in May 2015 and was promoted to Associate Professor of Biology March 2016.  Dr. Boulton was named Interim Dean of the Graduate School in June, 2016 and will continue in that role through the 2017-18 academic year as well.  As Interim Dean, Dr. Boulton oversees all admissions and enrollment operations in the Graduate School, in addition to many support services for current graduate students from new-student orientation and international internships to career education and the annual Three-Minute Thesis (3MT) competition.

Prior to her dean appointment, she enjoyed teaching a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses for the biology department and ENV program with a focus on climate change and insect ecology.  Dr. Boulton received her Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of California, Davis, her master’s in Animal Behavior from Bucknell University, and her bachelor’s degree (liberally trained with a double major in psychology and classics) from Centre College where she graduated cum laude and as a member of Phi Beta Kappa.aprilpic2

An insect ecologist by training, she has published in several peer-reviewed scientific journals and was awarded a research grant by the USDA to investigate control measures for the small-hive beetle, a pest of the commercial honeybee.  Dr. Boulton was instrumental in the passage of the Maryland Pollinator Protection Act, which also resulted in her appearance on Kojo Nmandi’s WAMU radio show and an article in the Washington Post.

Dr. Boulton is a founding member of the Graduate Women in Science (GWIS), Greater Maryland Chapter and serves on the Board of Directors of the Fort Detrick Alliance.

Charting the Labyrinth: Hood Graduate Student to Present at Conference

Posted by | Graduate School Highlights, Thanatology | No Comments

Kailipic6Kaili van Waveren, a Master’s candidate in Hood College’s Thanatology program, will present research at the 11th Annual Graduate Student Conference: Beyond Disciplines: Understanding the World Around Us at the University of Rhode Island in April.  She is one of several Hood students presenting.

Kaili’s specific area of interest is suicidology.  In “Charting the Labyrinth: An Exploration of Suicide Among 5-to 24-year-olds in America.” she uses her educational background to research and write about suicide from an epidemiological and cultural perspective, with a focus on child and preadolescent suicidality.  She hopes that this research will provide the scaffolding for the future research she plans to undertake and that this conference will be the first of many in her future.

Kaili received her undergraduate degree – with a double major in writing and anthropology – from Johns Hopkins University.

Educational Leadership Certificate Preparation – Discovering Your Own Leadership Skills

Posted by | Educational Leadership, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

Emily Quinlanpic1Emily E. Quinlan, already armed with a Hood College Master’s degree in special education, also earned a certificate in Educational Leadership from Hood, which puts her on the path toward an administrative career in education.  Emily is an Instructional Coordinator for Elementary Special Education for Frederick County Public Schools. She delivers consultative and direct services to students with disabilities and their instructional staffs at the district’s 36 elementary schools. Additionally, she mentors teachers, conducts observations, monitors instructional programming and – as well as provides professional development. Prior to her current position, Emily was an FCPS Teacher Specialist and Coordinator for Secondary Schools.

Emily credits Hood’s curriculum and faculty for equipping her with effective mentoring, collaboration and professional development strategies for working with teachers of varying experience levels as well as administrators in schools with diverse needs. “(The Educational Leadership Certificate Program) is great for discovering your own leadership skills and qualities while learning how to build positive relationships with other educators.” The educational leadership program at Hood provides insight into the intricacies of school-based and systemic needs and how leadership roles impact those needs. The lessons and rigor of the leadership program have allowed Emily to adapt to new leadership roles, support schools based on their individual needs, and work to build teacher-leaders throughout the county.

Hood College – Part of My Life – From Undergraduate to Doctorate

Posted by | Doctorates, Educational Leadership, Graduate School Highlights, Uncategorized | No Comments

AP photo1Hood College alumnus Joshua Work has earned his undergraduate degree in History (along with a Maryland Teaching Certificate), and his Master’s in Educational Leadership from the school.  A Doctorate of Organizational Leadership (DOL) candidate, Josh is on his way to becoming one of Hood’s first “Three Degree” graduates.  Josh, his wife Casey and three children Ava, Kai, and Chad live in Frederick.

He is currently an Assistant Principal for Frederick County Public Schools, and works at Middletown Middle School, as part of a leadership team that implements and coordinates the school program for 835 students and 70 staff, using rigor and working within a culture of cooperation, organization, determination and excellence.  All of this to promote a positive school culture that fosters the social development and student achievement.

Joshua grew up in Frederick County and graduated from Walkersville High School in 2005. While at Walkersville he interned at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at Ft. Detrick. He applied to Hood for his undergraduate degree, he says, because “I knew that Hood was an excellent school with a distinguished reputation. Since I was still local, I was able to retain my internship position throughout my undergraduate degree at NCI.

While in pursuit of his undergraduate degree, Joshua enlisted in the United States Marine Corps Reserve (USMCR). After completing boot camp and his military occupational specialty school, he returned to Hood to complete his degree. He remained at Hood, NCI, and his USMC reserve unit until his graduation in May, 2009.  Following graduation, he was deployed to Helmand Province, Afghanistan, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, and served as a Fire Direction Center chief and vehicle commander for a light armored mortar vehicle.

Joshua returned to the States in May, 2010 and was hired to teach social studies for FCPS.  While teaching, he earned his M.S. in Educational Leadership.

“Hood has become a part of my life. I met my wife there during undergrad and we got married during our senior year. Beyond the well-rounded liberal arts curriculum, I believe what makes Hood so wonderful is the staff and faculty that have been supportive over the years. I have been fortunate to develop great relationships with Mr. (Roger) Stenersen, Dr. (Jennifer) Cuddapah, and Dr. (Kathleen) Bands and value them all as lifelong mentors. I am humbled by all of time and effort that my professors have provided to me from my undergraduate to the Doctorate. One way to honor their tutelage is to successfully complete the doctoral program with Hood’s inaugural doctoral cohort. One day I hope to return to Hood and support graduates in any capacity that I can.”