Ceramics

Hood College Ceramic Arts students join with collectors in campus art exhibition

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Graduate students in Hood College’s ceramic arts programs recently participated in a campus exhibition, “Collectors’ Voices in Ceramic Art: A Leading Edge Exhibition.”  The students were enrolled in ARTS 543, History of Ceramic Arts and completed the exhibition as part of the class.  Students were paired with a regional art collector to research and present on collected ceramic artwork.

Professor Joyce Michaud, Hood’s Program Director for Ceramic Arts, had this to say about the exhibition.

How did you decide to stage this exhibition? 

Eric Serritella Tea potMarc Grainer, a member of our advisory proposed the exhibition and the advisory council voted in favor of its staging. The exhibition and the accompanying lectures are a part of our yearlong colloquium and is sponsored by the Humanities Council and Ceramic Arts Program.  ARTS 543 places special emphasis on broadening the knowledge and experience of students through personal involvement in researching and encountering historic work.  This exhibition brought together a breadth of ceramic history, especially in the up close and personal experience provided by our collectors, who welcomed students into their homes to talk about their collections and the motivations behind their collecting.  These people have knowledge and passion for ceramics, both contemporary and historic.

 

 

How did you decide on which pieces to display? 

Jenna Gianni, Director of the Galleries, and I, along with members of the advisory council, visited collector’s homes.  The collectors then honed in on a unique piece that they were willing to loan to Hood College for the month long exhibition.

How did the collections in this exhibition differ from the works showcased at prior exhibitions? 

The value of this exhibition was extremely high.  Being able to see these pieces in the beautiful Hood College Whitaker Gallery was a real treat.  The intermingling of historic and contemporary work in one gallery/exhibition was a rare experience.  The ages intermingling provided an eclectic conversation both human and ceramic.

What were the high points of the exhibition?

Collector and former Advisory Council member David Rehfuss wrote to a friend after attending the exhibition opening reception.  “I visited the Hood College Collectors Voices in Ceramic Arts: A Leading Edge Exhibition yesterday and was impressed. The array and diversity of the 22 ceramics there made for good viewing and good conversation between the visitors”.

 

What were the outcomes for the students that participated in this exhibition?

The students were exposed to a wide range of historic and contemporary ceramic art to which many had not yet been exposed.  Additionally, they developed personal relationships with the collectors, learning more about building and maintaining a collection, as well as the periods in the history of ceramic art with an emphasis on how ceramic arts fit into the contemporary art world.

Also, the students were brought into the real world of their own passions and career choices that may rely on the collectors to provide and support, including primary research and integrating the history of the work, the stories of the collecting, and the legacy that will last beyond the collectors themselves.

Are there plans to hold a similar exhibition soon? 

The 2018-2019 gallery calendar offers great opportunities for another exciting exhibition and the conversations have already begun!

Hood College Master of Fine Arts in Ceramics candidate featured in campus exhibition

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PR PicMeg Lau is a Hood College Master of Fine Arts in Ceramics candidate who will be exhibiting on campus this April as part of her thesis.  “The Past is Present” will run from April 12 to 30 at the Whitaker Campus Center Gallery. Meg will also present a gallery talk and host an opening reception scheduled April 14from 4:30 to 7 p.m. The on display at the exhibition include large smoke fired urns ranging from sixteen to thirty-two inches tall and smaller urn forms ranging from six to twelve inches, all created for the containment of personal and communal memories of loved ones. They all have the physical potential to contain relics, memorabilia, or cremation ashes for one or more family members.  The urns celebrate the past and, will be cherished in the future. The exhibition speaks to the history of ceramics and the relationships that have existed between women, family, spirituality and the vessel. The urns in this exhibit represent life, both past and present.

Meg shares her Hood experience with us below.

Background

Meg is from Strasburg, Pennsylvania and teaches high school ceramics in the Lampeter-Strasburg School District.  She earned her Bachelor of Science in Art Education from Millersville University and her Master’s in Art Education from Kutztown University. She will complete her Masters of Fine Arts in Ceramic Arts this spring at Hood.

Hood College experience

My experience at Hood has been amazing.  The MFA Ceramic Arts program is very holistic, as it offers students a very strong foundation for technique, aesthetics, history, critical analysis, as well as marketing strategies for the artist.  Additionally, this program has allowed me to meet other artists/students from all over the country.  We have been able to work with one another collaboratively using Hood’s fabulous facilities.

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Impact of the MFA program on your career

As a teacher I have had the opportunity to bring to my students everything that this program has given to me. Professor Joyce Michaud and all of the teachers at Hood have modeled such dedication to their students, which has allowed me to bring an abundant amount of technical, historical and critical knowledge directly back to my classroom.

Sources of inspiration

I am inspired by the history of ceramics as well as by my family.

Hood college graduate school students featured in ceramic arts exhibit

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Students from Hood College Graduate School programs in ceramic arts are featured in an exhibit on campus.

“Collectors’ Voices in Ceramic Art: A Leading Edge Exhibition,” runs from March 2-April 2 in the Whitaker Campus Center Gallery. Collectors have loaned pieces of their personal collections to Hood for a show that features historical and contemporary ceramics from 19 major regional collectors, many affiliated with the James Renwick Alliance, a nonprofit organization that celebrates America’s craft artists. The pieces are from around the globe.

Ceramic arts graduate students were paired with a collector and researched the collected ceramic artwork and interviewed the collectors, researching the history of the work and the stories surrounding the acquisition of the pieces. During the exhibition, two presentations, “History and Legacy: A Conversation with Collectors,” will feature the students and the collectors as they present their research. The presentations will take place March 11 and March 25 from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Whitaker Campus Center Commons.

The Whitaker Gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The opening reception is March 5 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. in Whitaker Commons. The project is co-sponsored by the Hood College Humanities Council’s 2016-17 NEH colloquium series, “Narrative at the Edge of the World,” and the Ceramic Arts graduate program. All events are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Jenna Gianni at gianni@hood.edu or 301-696-3285.

 

 

Hood Faculty and Alums “Making Good”

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making-good-cover
Two members of the Hood community – Jacklyn Scott and Kristin Müller – are among four co-authors of a forthcoming book- “Making Good: An Inspirational Guide to Being an Artist Craftsman”. The book will be released on April 28th.

Jacklyn is completing her degree in the MFA in Ceramic Arts program and also works as Hood’s studio arts manager while Kristin is a Hood alumna (MFA, 2008) and adjunct faculty in Ceramic Arts.  Their co-authors are Tommy Simpson and Stuart Kestenbaum.

The book is a collection of interviews with forty one artists accompanied by more than 260 photos showing the artists, their work spaces, and their creations. According to Jacklyn, one of the authors’ main goals was that “the book serve as a primer for inspiration to motivate young, middle aged and senior individuals who may be looking for guidance and ways to respond to their inner voice, to take risks and take action with their artistic practice.”

The full text of our chat with Jacklyn is below.

How did you get the idea to do a collection of interviews instead of a full-length book?

We wanted to feature the stories of various artists in different craft-mediums to cover a wide range of experiences. Someone who grew up knowing they were going to be an artist will have a very different experience than someone who went to school to be a doctor and then changed directions mid-career to become an artist. We wanted to represent as many of these instances to make sure the book is relatable. The concept of the book is simple, to present forty one makers/artists who have pursued their passion of making art and making a living with illustrations and personal narrative about how they have made their way in the art world.  We prompted the featured artists to address specific opportunities and challenges that have shaped their careers asking them to specify pivotal moments, influential people and opportunities that spurred them on.

What goals did you have for this guide when you set out to write it and did you achieve them?

Our hope is that the book will serve as a primer for inspiration to motivate young, to middle aged and senior individuals who may be looking for guidance and ways to respond to their inner voice, to take risks and take action with their artistic practice. The book is visually engaging, a sort of window into the lives of makers, their practice and the interesting ways in which their creative practice takes form and reaches others.

How did you meet your co-authors?

Kristin Muller is my mother and I met Tommy Simpson when I was very young and he was collaborating with my mother in the clay studio. Now, we are colleagues in the art world. He is a force of nature, moving through various media including clay, rugs, wood, and printmaking.

What key message did you set out to pass across by writing this book?

We hope that our readers will find inspiration to set forth on their own creative journeys and to take risks in their own practices.

How long did it take and how were you able to balance this alongside work and other commitments?

I am working towards my MFA in Ceramic Arts, but thankfully the program is mostly weekend intensive. So after work, if I wasn’t in the clay studio, I was camped out at Starbucks over-caffeinating myself. I also drove home 8 hours every weekend so Kristin and I could meet with artists to interview them, or have conference calls with those that were further away.

What was the hardest part of writing this book?

The hardest part of the writing the book was trying to capture the spirit of the artist in a few succinct paragraphs. Some of the artists gave us hours of content, and others we needed to probe a bit more for the interesting tidbits of their history and process.

What did you enjoy most about writing this book?

Gosh, I feel so lucky to have had the opportunity to talk to these forty one artists who have so much wisdom and charisma!

Any memorable moments while writing the book?

I met so many talented artists in the process.

Who are your target audience?

Our target audience are those who are just beginning their careers in art, looking to transition into being an artist mid-career, artists who need a push.

Any plans for a sequel?

Not yet… but we have talked about putting together an exhibition of work from the artists involved in the book.
Click to order Making Good: An Inspirational Guide to Being an Artist Craftsman on Amazon.com

Hood College MFA graduate designs Kentucky Governor’s Commemorative Award

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Matthew-Gaddie-560x406

Recipients of the 2016 Kentucky Governor’s Awards in the Arts, the state’s highest arts honors, will each receive a handmade platter created by Kentucky Crafted artist Matthew Gaddie of Bardstown. Gaddie said “I am grateful to be connected to continuing Kentucky’s cultural traditions and proud to be a practicing craftsman in our Commonwealth.”

Gaddie, who completed his Master of Fine Arts in Studio Ceramics at Hood in 2016, owns and operates The Meadows Pottery on his 315-acre family farm in Nelson County, approximately 60 miles west of Lexington.  He has been a full-time studio ceramic artist since 2007 and was an adjunct professor of art at St. Catharine College in Springfield from 2007 until its recent closing. In 2003, he received his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Ceramics from the University of Evansville. He earned his Hood degree by making the 10-hour commute several times each year.

“In a time of mass produced uniformity, my ultimate goal is to create works that are unique, each piece having faithfully recorded its own tale of creation, of struggle, of success, of failure, of imperfection and of hope. A human tale told in clay and preserved through fire,” Gaddie said. “I am deeply honored to be a part of this award ceremony. I am grateful to be connected to continuing Kentucky’s cultural traditions and proud to be a practicing craftsman in our Commonwealth.”

The Governor’s Awards in the Arts are coordinated by the Kentucky Arts Council and honor those who have made significant contributions and achievements in the arts throughout the Commonwealth. Each year, the arts council commissions an artist to create a piece of original artwork to be presented to the recipients during the awards ceremony.

The 2016 Governor’s Awards in the Arts were presented on Friday, Oct. 21st, 2016. For more information about the awards ceremony, visit Governor’s Awards in the Arts

MFA Candidate recognized by CCSA

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Bre-Kathman-11-15-edited-150x150Bre Kathman, an alumna of Hood’s Master of Arts in Ceramic Arts program was honored with three awards at the 2016 Contemporary Ceramics Studio Association (CCSA) National convention, held September 9-12 in Charleston, South Carolina. Bre won awards for-

  1. Best Individual Support
  2. Best Individual Educational Instructor
  3. Best Individual Industry Contributor

In addition, Bre was also voted to the Supplier seat on the CCSA Board of Directors for a 2 year term.

Bre is a traditional potter by trade and she currently works as an Education Specialist at Chesapeake Ceramics where she gets to spend a lot of time with schools and teachers.

Ceramic Arts Students Visit Prominent Collector’s Home

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Ceramics Buchanan crop

Members of the Graduate School’s Ceramic ARTS 564 Aesthetics and Criticism class recently visited the home of noted collector Robert Buchanan to view his collection of ceramic arts.

The visit allowed students to see these outstanding pieces, such as the Ruth Duckworth wall sculpture seen in the photo, up close in a home setting. They had the opportunity to talk with the collector about the art work and the artists who created them.

Bob, a third-generation commercial builder/developer based in Montgomery County, MD, shares with his wife Sharon a deep appreciation for art and artists. Their private collection, which they often exhibit in public galleries, includes ceramics, prints, sculpture and paintings by artists of local and international renown. Each of Buchanan Partners’ commercial real estate projects have featured commissioned art as an integral component of their development.

Workshop: Learn How to Photograph Ceramics

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Photograph ceramics croppedHood’s ceramic arts program director, Joyce Michaud, will teach the aesthetic and composition considerations of photographing ceramic art at a workshop Feb. 19-21, 2016. The one-credit, hands-on weekend session will involve students in developing personal portfolios and slide libraries of individual works and images.

The fee is $185. Non-tuition students may register at www.secure.hood.edu/ceramics. For information about the Graduate Schools master’s, fine arts and certificate programs in ceramic arts, visit www.hood.edu/graduate.

 

2016 MA Candidate Honored by CCSA

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Bre Kathman 11-15  editedAfter finishing her Ceramic Arts Certificate requirements, Bre Kathman returned to Hood Graduate School to pursue her MA. She has just passed her comps and is excited to be graduating in May 2016. Bre says she chose Hood for her graduate studies because in addition to the art of ceramics, the program enabled her “to learn the science behind how clay worked.”

In September the Iowa native received the 2015 Best Individual Support Award from CCSA (Contemporary Ceramic Studios Association) in recognition of superb support and technical knowledge in  clay, glaze, glass and canvas painting. Bre is an education specialist with Chesapeake Ceramics, an international company that supplies bisque and other ceramics supplies to businesses around the world. In her role there, she travels around the country teaching ceramic and glass classes to other companies and also instructs teachers in clay and glass best practices.