The Graduate School

Hood Hosts Student-Led Humanities Conference

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Humanities 1September 16th saw Hood College hosting its first ever student-led Humanities conference! “Discovering the Humanities” featured undergraduate and graduate students from Hood and other area colleges and universities. According to Dr. Corey Campion, director of Hood’s MA Program in Humanities, “the main goal was to showcase the exciting work students do in the Humanities at the undergrad and grad level at Hood and area schools”.  The presentations were varied, and topics ranged from literature, art, and gender, to popular culture, and world and local history. Where else would you find a presentation about “Applying and Comparing Baroque Features in Shakespeare’s The Tempest and TV Show Lost”, followed by “The Re-Imagined, Re-Defined, and Re-Created Roles of Carroll Creek” and “The Avant-Garde: Theory and Nature of Alienation”?

University of Pennsylvania Professor Bethany Wiggin, founder of the Penn Program in the Environmental Humanities, gave the keynote focusing on the Humanities in higher education as well as the importance of working across disciplines as scholars. Hood English Professor Aaron Angello called Wiggin’s talk “rousing.”

 

Humanities 2The conference emphasized the student presenters themselves. Sarah Holsapple, a Hood Humanities graduate student, explained “There were several students from other schools who also participated, and it was a rare opportunity to talk about our research together and share our ideas with peers”. Her presentation, in the Modern American section of the conference, combined politics, philosophy, music, and culture when critiquing the avant-garde movement in music. Hood student  Asmaa Aaouinti-Haris presented in the Popular Culture section about Re-defining Black Masculinities in Beyonce’s Lemonade.” She also commented on the social and communal worth of the conference, saying “it was my first conference and I was excited and grateful to be able to share my research with classmates, professors and people from other universities. I loved the way in which the conference was organized. The atmosphere was perfect!”

 

Campion hopes this will be the start of a tradition. He looks forward to next year, saying “the presentations were excellent and showed an impressive level of rigor. It was a great event that gave us a chance to celebrate the humanities which are so central to the liberal arts tradition here at Hood. We’re excited about next year’s conference!” The date is already set for September 15, 2018.

 

See photos and the full schedule of this years’ conference.

Learning to Lead, Leading to Learn

Posted by | Educational Leadership, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

HendersonFor Raythorne “RJ” Henderson, continuing his education was an obvious choice. An enthusiastic and innovative teacher who motivates his students through ideas like naming their groups after colleges, he decided on the Educational Leadership program at The Graduate School at Hood College, where he became part of a community which helped him professionally and personally. He credits Hood with helping him “gain a global perspective of the type of work in which administrators engage”.

 

In March of 2017, near the end of his program, RJ was diagnosed with End Stage Renal Disease, causing kidney failure. Although hospitalized for several weeks and in need of rest and dialysis, he was able to graduate that May. He credits his professors and cohort members with helping him and making accommodations so that he was able to finish on schedule. He currently has a living donor and will receive a transplant on October 31, 2017.

 

RJ graduated from Frederick High School in 2004 and received his B.A. in Elementary Education from Salisbury University. After four years of teaching in Wicomico County, he returned to Frederick to teach at Hillcrest Elementary. After several years, he made the move to Montgomery County, where he currently teaches, for family and career growth.

 

While teaching in Frederick, he started coursework on campus at Hood, but shifted to the Hood/MCPS Cohort Program when he moved to Montgomery County. This program allows teachers to take Hood Ed Leadership classes hosted locally in MCPS facilities. He explains that “the cohort was an excellent experience as I was able to move from one course to another with the same group of colleagues.  We were constantly in contact with one another and built meaningful relationships.  It was great to gain the insight and hear the perspective of other professionals, some in positions other than classroom teachers. Travel time was also cut significantly. [However] there’s just something special about taking a class on campus. The best way I can describe it is that it’s like reading the e-version of a book versus the hard copy.  They each have their advantages and it’s simply a personal preference.”

 

RJ is hoping for a position as an Assistant Principal next year, and believes that his classes at Hood allowed “networking with other future administrators, and learning from some of the best educators in the country.  It was extremely beneficial to learn from those who are involved in the work on a daily basis”. We are #HoodProud of RJ and hope to hear about Principal Henderson soon!

 

Hood also offers the Educational Leadership Cohort Program for teachers in Washington County, MD and Berkeley County, WV. For more information click the above link or email gofurther@hood.edu.

 

A Hood Legacy

Posted by | Ceramics, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

scottFor Jackie Scott, coming to Hood College for her MFA in Ceramics was following a family tradition.  “My mother is a Hood alum and I was aware of the amazing education and facilities here. I knew that Joyce Michaud had a strong program and that she could teach me technical skills that others could not.” Jackie’s mother got her MFA from Hood in 2014 and Jackie is currently working on her own degree, which included a personal exhibition at Hood last summer. She also works as the school’s Studio Arts Manager.

 

Growing up, Jackie volunteered at a craft school in exchange for classes and has since worked in sculpture, printmaking, glass, wood, metal, and clay. She earned her B.A. in Studio Arts from Temple University in 2014, and shares a studio with her mother, who provides lots of “consistent feedback”.  scott work

 

Jackie praises the Hood community, where “students are motivated and excited about learning.” She appreciates how students work together and share information, leading to great discussions and practical applications. As a Hood student, she is grateful for important experiences, such as getting to attend the National Clay Conference yearly, building a ceramic 3D printer and working with artists from around the world.

 

Adventurous Internship in Guam

Posted by | Environmental Biology, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

charlieCharlie Cheul – Woo Kwak, an Environmental Biology student at Hood College, has returned from a summer internship in Guam, spent surveying the Guam National Wildlife Refuge. This competitive internship is known as USFWS-DFP US Fish and Wildlife Service – Directorate Fellowship Program (USFWS-DEP), and Charlie first heard about it from Graduate School Dean Dr. April Boulton. He went through the long process of applying for a federal position, succeeded and headed off to Guam.

Charlie’s internship consisted largely of surveying the closed side of the Guam National Wildlife Refuge, which had never been comprehensively explored and surveyed. What made it even more adventurous is the fact that there was no data on what could be out there. At times, Charlie was the first person who ever set foot at that part of the Refuge. He successfully recorded over 170 survey plots on soil, dominant species, canopy cover, ungulate damage and target plant species. Charlie also put over 1000 trees on a final map. His most memorable experience was when he first created a map using ArcMap with his field data. About a month and a half into the project, he put about one quarter of the data points into the mapping software, creating a visual representation of everything that was in the thick of the jungle. “This was the first time I had ever taken on a professional project from start to finish – from field data to map – from ground-truthing to presentation.

Fun moments were not scarce. Charlie found an ancient pictograph of the indigenous Chamorro people drawn on a cave wall.  As no one had seen that relic before Charlie, he was excited to share that news to everyone, including the archaeologists on the island!  “As a ‘bonus,’ I walked over an unexploded grenade from WWII.  It didn’t explode when I stepped over it!! When asked to provide advice to our current students, Charlie emphasized the importance of persistence. “I would advise that they apply to as many internship or practicum as possible.  I applied to total of 16 positions and received 15 rejection letters prior to getting the one acceptance!”

Creating Community Leaders

Posted by | Business Administration, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

hood 1Kevin Brown and Marlon Ramirez, students in Hood College’s MBA program, have completed The Frederick County Future Minority Business Leaders Program. An initiative of the Frederick County Office of Economic Development, the program is designed to help cultivate and grow future minority business leaders and business owners within Frederick County. Although full time students and not business owners, Marlon and Kevin applied and were accepted due to the fact that they plan on owning a business in the future and reflect strong leadership qualities. Participants spend two hours one Friday per month at the Office of Economic Development.
The program’s career and business lessons are taught by local minority leaders and business professionals and are specifically geared towards business owners or those who have aspirations to become one. Among the key messages is the importance of “networking.” “The program exposes you to very successful and important individuals.  In addition, the background of my classmates is outstanding, which also allows each student to learn from one another,” said Marlon. Some of the other valuable lessons focus on how to market yourself, and perfect time management.

Kevin emphasized that his Hood experience had a significant impact as it has prepared him for all the marketing and management topics of the program. Marlon added: “Without a doubt, the courses I have taken in my MBA studies have assisted me in understanding this program better.  There have been many topics discussed in class that have been brought up during this program.”

Both students strongly encourage members of the minority community at Hood to apply for this program if they are interested in learning more about starting and developing a business or working with like-minded business professionals.

 

From Student to Mentor: Justine Freimanis Continues At Hood

Posted by | Graduate School Highlights, Reading Specialization | No Comments

JustineJustine Freimanis has experienced Hood College as an undergraduate student, graduate student, and teacher. In 1997, she received her undergraduate degrees in Early Childhood Education and Psychology. She immediately got a job teaching in Frederick County Public Schools, where she has now been for 20 years! In 2004, she earned came back to Hood for her graduate degree, an MS in Reading Specialization. As of 2017, she is the literacy specialist at Monocacy Elementary School, where she is also the Professional Development School (PDS) coordinator. This role has her organizing students from Hood and other programs, such as Frederick Community College, who come to Monocacy for their student teaching internships. Even with this, Justine’s work at Hood isn’t quite done. She is taking classes in the Educational Leadership program, working toward her administrative certification. Beyond taking classes, she is also helping future literacy specialists as a mentor teacher in the 2017 Reading Clinic, where participants in the Reading Specialization graduate program apply their skills working with elementary and Secondary students. Ellen Koitz, head of the Reading Specialization program, is pleased to have an outstanding graduate back to help teach future literacy specialists.

Justine attributes her continued affiliation with both Hood and FCPS to how the two work well together. She explains that “professors and staff at Hood work really hard to communicate with the school system, keep the focus consistent, and give the students an understanding of what is really going on with education in the real world”. She also states that she has had great experiences here with staff and peers. Hood is happy to have her back!

From Illinois…to Pennsylvania…To Hood

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Derrion May Summer 2017

Derrion May is a first-semester student in Hood College’s Environmental Biology Master’s program. A native of Illinois, he graduated from Waynesburg University in Waynesburg, PA with a degree in general biology. The ocean has been a passion of his since the age of 12 when he became fascinated with the different species found underneath waves.

With experience in a marine biology lab as well as a summer internship at Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, where his senior research project focused on investigating stingray mucus for novel antibiotics, Derrion recently started a full-time position as a Study Support Associate with Charles Rivers Laboratories, where he’ll be working with notable researchers on zebrafish and other aquatic species at their research campus in Ashburn, Virginia.

Derrion always wanted to pursue a graduate degree, but wasn’t sure about the most suitable time. During his final semester, he started looking into graduate programs and what they offered, and realized that Hood was a perfect fit. “I liked the possibility of being able to work as a science professional while still being able to pursue a graduate degree.”

Hood’s new Graduate Housing was a fit as well. “I thought that living on campus would be a good opportunity to be a part of a new community, while only being a short walk away from my classes.” His decision has brought him into contact with new acquaintances and students with different backgrounds as well as providing the opportunity to become more familiar with the area.

Derrion emphasizes how important the help from the entire graduate school was as he transitioned from a student struggling to finish his last undergraduate class this past summer to becoming a science professional. He looks forward to more exciting moments and unique opportunities as he pursues his graduate degree at Hood.

More Than Just Molding Clay!

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Participants in Hood College’s Graduate Ceramics Arts programs have several degree options, but all students are working with both theory and practice in ceramics. Whether they are working towards a Ceramic Arts Certificate, Masters of Arts (M.A.), or Masters of Fine Arts (MFA), students develop their own style and point of view. Several exhibited over the summer, each showing different techniques.

IMG_0196 smallJanet Greer earned an M.A. this summer, and created an exhibition called “Mudpies and Monsters”. A grandmother, Greer chose to feature ideas from her imagination and from the work of six of her grandchildren. She created both functional and decorative pieces using mostly porcelain clay in electric, wood, soda, and Raku firings.

IMG_0250 small“Surviving Fire” by Ryan McGlone showed ceramic canteens faced with images of war. An art teacher who works with disabled children, McGlone chose to “show the survival and emotion of war in the mind, heart, and soul” in this exhibition, moving to a more serious and emotional perspective.

MFA recipient Joseph Delphia’s exhibition was titled “A Tactile Vision.” Joe is a functional artist and ceramics teacher who “hopes that his pots become objects that spend more time in a hand than on a shelf”. His work is fired in a wood-burning kiln, which creates color and texture through marks of the ash and flame.

Dawn Lovell’s exhibition was titled “Glazes, You Rock!”. As the title suggests, Lovell used a variety of glazes to create pieces with different textures and colors to show a variety of natural-looking works.

Delphia small IMG_0238 small

Why the Humanities?

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DebarbaThe Graduate School at Hood College takes pride in its diversity…of people and programs. One such program is the Master of Arts in Humanities. Many students credit the program’s interdisciplinary focus for their increase in both analytical and big-picture thinking. One such student is Robert DeBarba, who started the program in fall of 2016.

A 2015 graduate of Mount St. Mary’s University with a Bachelor of Arts in History, Robert stayed in Maryland and began work as a government contractor. When looking to continue his education, he chose the Hood Humanities program because he “really liked how the Humanities program was tailored to personal interests of study and offered a well-rounded variety of coursework.” A year into the program, he credits it with helping advance his career due to his increased ability to analyze, interpret, and articulate abstract concepts. He describes the program as a ‘skill set’ degree that has provided him with a unique combination of analytical tools in a very technical field. After receiving his Master’s, Robert intends to continue his education with a Ph.D. and would like to become a teacher.

Hood Alum receives Department of Defense’s highest civilian award

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BerstAward2 (1) Kathleen Berst, a 2017 graduate of Hood College’s MBA program, has been awarded the “Department of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service Award,” the highest award given to career civilian employees of the US Department of Defense. It is given to “those employees whose careers reflect exceptional devotion to duty and whose contributions are of a significant value when it comes to the efficiency, economy or other improvements in Department of Defense (DoD).” Kathleen received the award for leading the Medical Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Facility, and ultimately for her recommendation that it be terminated. This challenging recommendation and her efforts resulted in over one billion dollars of savings and cost avoidance for the DoD. Kathleen was recognized at the Pentagon Annual Award Ceremony, and her importance can especially be seen in the words of Deputy Defense Secretary Bob Work, “You bring honor to the tradition of the civilian workforce and public service. Your dedication strengthens our country’s security and prosperity.”

Her professional journey took Kathleen from a biologist in army labs to being an Assistant Vaccine Manager in the Joint Vaccine Acquisition Program (JVAP), and ultimately to Project Manager for the Medical Countermeasure Test and Evaluation Facility and her current role as Deputy Commander of Acquisition for the US Army Medical Material Development Activity (USAMMDA). While a biologist, Kathleen realized she did not want to work in a lab for the rest of her life, and that earning her MBA would allow her to continue using her scientific knowledge in another setting. She started her MBA in 2000, and the experience was impactful on her and her career. “Just starting my MBA courses changed everything. The more I learned in my courses, the more questions I asked at work.” This helped make additional connections, which eventually resulted in Kathleen’s first management role in 2001. “Most of what I was learning in my MBA courses was directly applicable to my new job.  It was perfect! I was flying through my program and advancing at work.

Kathleen’s story does have a twist. Two classes before wrapping up her program, she found out she was pregnant with her first child. Due to complications and a new work position, she delayed degree completion. Soon enough, Kathleen changed positions and saw how her MBA knowledge was contributing to her career. “My career was blossoming because of what I had learned in my MBA program but my successful career had become a giant barrier that was preventing me from completing my MBA!” After speaking at Hood’s “Project Management” class in 2015, Kathleen’s desire to finish her MBA was revived. With the assistance of Dr. David Gurzick, she reenrolled and completed in 2017.

Her message to all is to “GET STARTED, ASK FOR HELP, AND KEEP LEARNING!” While many people are afraid to start or are terrified of failure, the solution is to “just move”. She emphasizes that asking for help is one of the best ways of figuring your career choices. “Most people will be willing to share what worked and what didn’t work. I have a handful of mentors and coaches with different strengths, so I look to them for guidance in different aspects of life and work.”