Highlights

The Graduate School at Hood College

Vanguard Teacher Program – Leadership Development

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Hood College and Frederick County Public Schools have partnered to offer the Vanguard Teacher Program, a leadership development program that aims to develop competency-based teacher leadership in public schools across the county.

The program focuses on four areas of teaching competencies: mindset, instructional technology, teaching practices, and professional learning and networking.

Mindset competencies include the core values or beliefs that guide a teacher’s thinking, behaviors, and actions, and which also help them shift toward new forms of teaching and learning.

Instructional technology skills help educators utilize technology to enrich their lessons. The goal is to transform learning experiences so they result in higher levels of achievement for students.

Teaching practice competencies are personal characteristics and patterns of behavior that help educators make the transition to new ways of teaching and learning. These qualities include integrating digital content, small group instruction, opportunities for student reflection and data-driven decision making.

Professional learning and networking skills are a more general set of skills that apply across roles and subject areas. These include collaboration and problem solving and are complex; they help practitioners tackle new tasks or develop solutions in situations that require organizational learning and innovation.

The Vanguard Teacher Program aims to develop competency-based, teacher leadership in public schools across the county. Vanguard Program candidates will be able to earn credits toward a related master’s degree in education at Hood while completing the program. Hood will provide up to nine graduate credits to participants who desire the graduate credits, provided they apply and are accepted to Hood College’s Graduate School as non-degree seeking students. Classes will take place in FCPS facilities.

Roger Stenersen, the Program Director of the Educational Leadership programs at Hood College, believes that the Vanguard Teacher Program constitutes an important addition to the FCPS-Hood partnership.  Stenersen said, “This new dimension incentivizes teacher growth toward system-identified priorities by providing a pathway to teacher salary increases as well as the option for teachers to earn graduate credits which can be counted toward a master’s degree at Hood.”

Hood College Thanatology Graduate to direct health services in Manatee County, Florida

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Joshua Barnett 8Joshua T. Barnett, an alumnus of Hood College’s Master of Arts in Thanatology program, has been hired by Manatee County, Florida as the county’s new health services manager.  Barnett joins the county’s Human Services Division to lead Manatee’s “Community Health Care Initiative” and to serve as the county’s staff liaison to the Health Care Advisory Board.

Barnett has spent his career managing public mental health, substance use and physical health treatment services for private, nonprofit and state government entities. For the past three-plus years he served as a consultant to a settlement agreement between the Justice Department and the state of Delaware, monitoring quality and treatment outcomes of community-based supportive services within the substance abuse and mental health division of the Delaware Department of Health and Social Services.

“Joshua joins our team with a broad range of needed attributes and skills,” deputy county administrator Karen Windon said in a statement on Friday. “His background in behavioral health and experience integrating primary care into that setting is exactly what we need in our community. That focus, coupled with his experience in data analytics and quality as they relate to the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Triple Aim, will place Manatee County on a positive path.”

Barnett said in a statement: “I am thrilled for the opportunity to return to my home state of Florida, to work with community shareholders on a collaborative agenda to enhance the use of Manatee County’s public health resources in the areas of prevention, intervention, care coordination, and treatment outcomes.”

He has served on boards throughout the Mid-Atlantic area focusing primarily on public awareness related to health care policy, improving mental health and substance use disorder screenings and grief awareness.

Barnett has a master’s of health science degree from The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore and a bachelor’s of science in psychology from Florida State University. He also is a certified psychiatric rehabilitation practitioner and is an internationally certified co-occurring disorders professional.

Hood’s Thanatology program is one of the few in the United States and the only one of this type available in Maryland. Both the certificate and master’s coursework specifically prepares individuals to work with the terminally ill and the bereaved and to provide death education.

Hood College is Launching a New M.S. Program in Mathematics Education

Posted by | Graduate School Highlights, Mathematics Education | No Comments

Hood College is officially launching its Master of Science in Mathematics Instructional Leadership on November 17th at 6 pm in the Whitaker Campus Center Commons, during the 8th Annual Mathematics Education Lecture.  The lecture, “Lesson Study and Beyond: Collaborative Reflection Cycles for Improving Mathematics Teaching” will be presented by Drs. Jennifer Bergner and Randall Groth from Salisbury University. The event, sponsored by Hood College’s Graduate School and the Maryland Council of Teachers of Mathematics, is free and open to the public. A light dinner will be served. RSVP to Christy Graybeal at graybeal@hood.edu by Nov.10.

Maryland’s adoption of the Mathematics Instructional Leadership (M.I.L.) endorsement is aligned with many professional organizations’ recommendations and a nationwide movement to advocate that every elementary school has access to a mathematics leader. Thus, it is likely that the need for Mathematics Instructional Leaders will grow in the coming years.

The Math Instructional Leadership program offers a pathway for currently certified teachers to meet the requirements of the Maryland State Department of Education Mathematics Instructional Leadership endorsement in either grades Pre-K-6 or grades 4-9 while also earning a master’s degree. Evening and summer courses accommodate working teachers. Many program courses are offered partially online, and courses may be taken in a variety of sequences.

New R Programming course to be offered in Spring 2017

Posted by | Computer Science, Graduate School Highlights, Information Technology, Management of Information Technology | No Comments

Hood College’s Graduate School is offering a new course focused on R programming this spring. The course, Advanced Data Analytics with R, is being offered by the Computer Science and Information Technology department.

According to Dr. Stephen Penn, program director of the Masters in Management Information Technology program and one of the faculty members who worked on developing the course, the course is being introduced to address the rise of job postings requiring R proficiency.  Also, the R programming language is gaining in popularity according to several websites, especially KDNuggets.

Students who take this course will receive an introduction to R, become familiar with the use of R in solving problems in statistics, and by the end of the semester be able to continue to learn about R packages and advanced functionality.  Students will use R to develop decision trees, neural networks, and regression models.

Penn added that the department plans to offer the course at least once a year in the spring semester. However, initial feedback about the course has been very high and the department is considering offering the course again in the fall.

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Preparing Leaders, Transforming Communities

Posted by | Doctorates, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

Students in Hood College’s initial doctoral cohort began their studies this fall. Candidates in the program can pursue one of two degree options – Doctorate of Organizational Leadership (D.O.L.) for those in public and private education, the non-profit sector, training and development, government or military, or the Doctorate of Business Administration (D.B.A.) for those employed in business and industry who hold graduate degrees in business.

The cohort-based, 3-year program is the only doctoral program in Frederick and the surrounding region that provides a campus based experience that builds on face-to-face interaction between faculty and students. The program brings together leaders with 8 to 10 years of progressive experience in their field together to learn, explore and research effective leadership.

Why not consider enhancing your leadership development by applying for the Fall 2017 doctoral program?  You will join a highly selective group of professionals who will enhance their personal and professional leadership skills, and network with leaders from throughout the region who serve as Leaders in Residence and share their expertise with the cohort.

For further information visit http://www.hood.edu/DPOL/

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Hood College’s Educational Leadership Programs

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Educational Leadership programswhich include the Educational Leadership Certificate and Master of Science in Educational Leadership – are among the most effective preparation programs for school principals in Maryland. Hood’s Educational Leadership program contains both on-campus and cohort-based programming and serves nearly three hundred candidates across the region who are seeking their professional credentials to become a school principal. Many of these Hood graduates are now practicing principals in school systems across the greater Frederick region.  Hood College has strong partnerships in the region which provide access to the program for candidates in four regional school systems.

Candidates in their master’s degree or post-master’s degree study benefit from the instructional expertise and knowledge of practicing school and school system leaders.  Following their coursework preparation, candidates turn theory into practice by engaging in the capstone experience of the program: a year-long internship under the mentorship of their principal.

For further information please visit http://www.hood.edu/EdLead/ and http://www.hood.edu/Graduate-School/Programs/Educational-Leadership-Certificate-Preparation.html

Student shares his Hood experience

Posted by | Environmental Biology, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

Curtis RogersCurtis Rogers, a Master of Science candidate in Environmental Biology works with the USDA Bee Research Lab in Beltsville, MD. A position he says he was able to get due to the guidance and support of professors at Hood. He has this to say about his experience at Hood.

Why did you choose to pursue a graduate degree?

I chose to pursue a graduate degree in order to open more doors directly related to my interests in the job market, and to hone in on specific areas of study important to my future goals.

Why did you choose Hood College graduate school?

I chose Hood College due to its intimate classroom settings and knowledgeable instructors. The programs offered also piqued my interests, as did the proximity to both my home and relatable career opportunities.

What do you value about your relationship with your professors?        

During my years at Hood, I was afforded the opportunity to develop great relationships with my many professors, including professors that I did not even have classes with. I feel as if the relationships I formed with them will transcend my years at Hood, and will extend into my future endeavors. Dr. April Boulton, my thesis advisor, has proven especially integral in my educational and professional pursuits. Without her guidance, I could not have attained what I have. Her faith in me directly led me to my current employment with the USDA Bee Research Lab in Beltsville, MD. This job is VERY rewarding and has furthered my education and experience immensely.

What is the most rewarding class or academic experience at Hood?

I greatly enjoyed all of my classes at Hood, and all of my professors pushed me towards excellence. The coursework that I completed in the insect sciences especially led me towards my main interests.

How do you manage your many other obligations?

Several weeks into Biostatistics, my first class at Hood, my daughter was born. The professor, Dr. Michael Alavanja, was extremely helpful and gave me a few extensions on some coursework. After she was born, balancing family and school was easy for me. During my first three years at Hood I worked on my family farm, so I cannot attest to scheduling related to a more common work routine.

Tips for prospective students

My main tip to prospective students wishing to enroll in Hood College’s graduate school would be to take time getting to know your professors and peers. Both can be very valuable resources to help you solve problems and learn efficiently.

What do you do in your spare time?

In my spare time, I spend time with my family mostly. Presently, my job is keeping me busy during the week, and finishing my thesis is keeping me busy on weekends. Once my thesis is completed, I hope to enjoy my weekends with friends and family a bit more.

Student makes career switch to teaching

Posted by | Graduate School Highlights, Humanities | No Comments

Patrick CassidyPatrick Cassidy, a Hood College Master of Arts in Humanities candidate with a concentration in Geography, is a General Science Teacher of 7th graders at Wynn Middle School in Tewksbury, MA. Patrick graduated from The Catholic University of America where he majored in Interdisciplinary Studies. Prior to his career switch to teaching, he worked as an officer with the United States Capitol Police. Here’s what he has to say about his time at Hood and career motivations.

Why did you choose Hood?

I chose Hood because I enjoy interdisciplinary studies and the Humanities program embraces such an approach.  I took several courses in undergrad in which I was introduced to the Humanities and I was hooked.  Also, Hood is cost effective for graduate students and is in a great location.

What have you enjoyed most about your time at Hood?

I thoroughly enjoyed meeting and working with other Hood students and with faculty members.  One of the things I miss, now that I am not in the classroom at Hood, is the classroom discussions and conversations with fellow students.

What’s your thesis topic?

My thesis topic is the legacy of exploration in the 20th Century.  I am looking at the long-lasting resonance of exploration and how such achievements become the crowning achievements for the nations represented by the explorers.  I am questioning what it is about exploration that makes it so captivating to an audience.

How has your experience at Hood contributed towards the change in career path?

My experiences at Hood helped me develop an appreciation for the impact which great teaching can have.  Also, my classes at Hood were eye-opening concerning environmental science.  Discovering new and interesting topics and issues in environmental science promoted a desire to enlighten other students in these areas.  This line of thought eventually led to my career change.

What do you love most about being a science teacher?

Opening students’ eyes to the world around them.  I have found the greatest satisfaction when students begin making observations about their surroundings.  They are getting their heads out of their cell phones and seeing some of the things we are discussing in the classroom at work in their daily lives. Admittedly, this does not happen all the time, but when it does, it’s rewarding.

Hood College MFA graduate designs Kentucky Governor’s Commemorative Award

Posted by | Ceramics, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

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Recipients of the 2016 Kentucky Governor’s Awards in the Arts, the state’s highest arts honors, will each receive a handmade platter created by Kentucky Crafted artist Matthew Gaddie of Bardstown. Gaddie said “I am grateful to be connected to continuing Kentucky’s cultural traditions and proud to be a practicing craftsman in our Commonwealth.”

Gaddie, who completed his Master of Fine Arts in Studio Ceramics at Hood in 2016, owns and operates The Meadows Pottery on his 315-acre family farm in Nelson County, approximately 60 miles west of Lexington.  He has been a full-time studio ceramic artist since 2007 and was an adjunct professor of art at St. Catharine College in Springfield from 2007 until its recent closing. In 2003, he received his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Ceramics from the University of Evansville. He earned his Hood degree by making the 10-hour commute several times each year.

“In a time of mass produced uniformity, my ultimate goal is to create works that are unique, each piece having faithfully recorded its own tale of creation, of struggle, of success, of failure, of imperfection and of hope. A human tale told in clay and preserved through fire,” Gaddie said. “I am deeply honored to be a part of this award ceremony. I am grateful to be connected to continuing Kentucky’s cultural traditions and proud to be a practicing craftsman in our Commonwealth.”

The Governor’s Awards in the Arts are coordinated by the Kentucky Arts Council and honor those who have made significant contributions and achievements in the arts throughout the Commonwealth. Each year, the arts council commissions an artist to create a piece of original artwork to be presented to the recipients during the awards ceremony.

The 2016 Governor’s Awards in the Arts were presented on Friday, Oct. 21st, 2016. For more information about the awards ceremony, visit Governor’s Awards in the Arts

Hood alumnus begins new job at World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

Posted by | Environmental Biology, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

Brad GoodmanBrad Goodman, an alumnus of Hood College’s Masters in Environmental Biology program, recently started a position with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in Washington DC. Brad graduated from the University of Delaware in 2008 with a B.A. in History, which he says was his favorite subject.

After graduation Brad served in the Peace Corps from 2008–10 and again in 2012. In the entire time he was with the Corps, he served in the Andes Mounts in Peru. He has this to say about that experience- “In addition to assisting local governments, villagers, and non-profits in implementing projects that increased local quality of life while preserving the environment, I was extremely lucky to live in a fantastically beautiful area at 12,000 feet above sea level. Seeing the great work being accomplished in conditions that were not always ideal, usually by very inspiring locals and Peace Corps volunteers, I became hooked. From that point on I decided my work in the environmental sector should turn into a career.

He tells us a more about his Hood experience and career goals.

Why did you choose Hood?
I chose the Environmental Biology Master’s program at Hood because it is a very flexible program in terms of the courses you can take. It is also the only program I could find in the Mid-Atlantic that accepted students who didn’t have a major in science or who were looking to change careers. The location close to Washington, DC and to home in Delaware also helped.

What did you enjoy most about your time at Hood?
Honestly, I had no idea where Frederick, Maryland even was when I applied. However, the more I got to know the downtown area and its cafes (especially the cafes!), the more I appreciated the beauty and surprising liveliness of the town. I really enjoyed taking a break to walk around Frederick, especially during the fall time of the year.

What project did you work on while at Hood?
I did a final project while working for Frederick County Government’s Office of Sustainability and Environmental Resources. There I helped develop the County’s first watershed restoration plan. My focus was on identifying management practices that lowered the total count of E. coli bacteria in waterways and on calculating the change in counts with these practices.

How did your experience at Hood contribute towards landing the position at WWF?
The hiring team told me that the most important thing is that the candidate demonstrates a passion and understanding of conservation work, since that is an indicator of someone who will be happy and work towards World Wildlife Fund’s goals. My Master’s degree demonstrated this, as it helped me understand the projects being done with WWF and shows my long-term commitment to conservation and sustainable development.

Tell us a little about your new position
As Project Coordinator, I’ll be assisting grantees and consultants in processing their project proposals for WWF. This is a great opportunity for me to learn about the many projects going on in all goal areas (such as climate, forests, food, etc.) and regions (Latin American and Caribbean, Africa, etc.). It is also a great opportunity to meet the many inspiring people working to protect wildlife and to promote a better way of living for human beings.