Highlights

The Graduate School at Hood College

Fall 2016 Computer Science and Information Technology Department Events

Posted by | Computer Science, Cybersecurity, Graduate School Highlights, Information Technology, Management of Information Technology | No Comments

This fall, the Computer Science and Information Technology Department at Hood will be co-hosting a number of exciting events here on campus. All students, faculty and staff are welcome.

Python Frederick- 2nd Wednesday Talk – Jupyter Notebook
Whitaker Commons
Thursday, September 14
6:30 p.m.

Python Frederick has a talk the second Wednesday of each month. This month:
Jupyter Notebooks (http://jupyter.org/) are helpful tools for anyone working with data. Popular with scientists of all types, Jupyter Notebooks let you work with Python right from your web browser! You can easily graph data and share your findings with others.
You’ll learn how to use Jupyter Notebooks so you can learn to supercharge any research you’re involved in.

Python Frederick – 3rd Saturday Open Workshop – Python Serverless Microframework for AWS
Coblentz Hall Seminar Room
Saturday, September 17
10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Python Frederick has an open workshop the 3rd Saturday of each month. You can work on a common project selected for the day or bring your own project and enlist the help of others.

Hack Frederick Hackathon
Coblentz Hall Seminar Room
Saturday, October 8
10:00 a.m.

Registration is required to attend this event. Additional information is available at https://www.hackfrederick.com/. Interested students should contact Dr. George Dimitoglou at dimitoglou@hood.edu to form teams.

Python Frederick- 2nd Wednesday Talk – pygame
Whitaker Commons
Wednesday, October 12
6:30 p.m.

Python Frederick’s Second Wednesday talk for October will talk gaming!  We’ll discuss pygame, a Python library for making video games, with the Frederick Game Development meetup.

MBA Student Assists with Cancer Cure

Posted by | Business Administration, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments
MJ Swicegood

MJ Swicegood

Martha “MJ” Swicegood, Hood MBA candidate, has recently worked on manufacturing the cancer drug Keytruda, which has helped save the lives of many people, including former President Jimmy Carter.

MJ explains “Cancer cells are basically your own cells, so your immune system isn’t aware that they’re an issue.  Keytruda is an immunological drug that helps the human body understand that cancer cells are what you want to attack.  The drug comes in, attaches to a receptor on the cancer, and acts like a flag so your body comes in and attacks it.  Instead of working like chemotherapy, which is very detrimental to your body, Keytruda works with your immune system and knocks the cancer out without the danger of radiation. “

Former President Carter says Keytruda helped stall advanced melanoma that had spread to his brain, while oncologists tell us it has helped about 40 percent of similar patients survive for as long as three years post-diagnosis.  Keytruda takes a new approach to treating cancer by stopping tumor cells from cloaking themselves against the normal, healthy immune system response.

Swicegood is working at a vaccine pilot plant now, where she helps manufacturing vaccines that go to topical studies all over the world, which may lead to new researches for new drugs to cure many others.

For further information about Keytruda please refer to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pembrolizumab

Hood Computer Science student interns at CISCO

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Yashraj Sinha

Yashraj Sinha

Yashraj Sinha, a student in Hood’s Master in Computer Science program, completed an internship with Cisco Inc. this summer. Yashraj is an international student from India, where he worked for Bosch and Cisco prior to starting his graduate studies at Hood. Here’s what he had to say about his experience:

How did you land the position?

I updated my profile on the main job boards—LinkedIn, Dice, Monster and CareerBuilder. I also visited the career pages of all major companies in the Embedded Systems domain and submitted applications for as many relevant opportunities as possible. I found this specific opportunity on the Cisco Career portal. The interview was a two round process but I had a head start since I had already worked for Cisco back in India.

What were your responsibilities and achievements?

My main task was to develop Hardware Diagnostic Software for next generation Terabit speed routers—the first routers of that speed category in the world.

My major achievement was building a bootable Linux ISO image containing Diagnostic Software for the routers. I was also able to take full responsibility for the task and worked independently most of the time.

Any advice for students interested in interning?             

Start applying early, as early as five months before your target start date. Remember that it’s a numbers game. The more jobs you apply to, the higher your chances of landing an offer.

Yashraj is hopeful that this experience particularly his achievements and the professional connections he made will serve as a launchpad for post-graduate career success.

Thank you, Yashraj!

Student earns scholarship award for summer internship project

Posted by | Environmental Biology, Geographic Information Systems, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

Jared Tomlin, C’16, a Master of Science candidate in environmental biology, was presented with a scholarship award from Science Systems and Applications, Inc. at a recent event held at the NASA headquarters.  He worked with NASA this summer on a project focused on ecological forecasting. This video gives an overview of the project.

Jared is back at Hood to start work on his thesis, which will examine the effect of riparian zones on flooding in the Shenandoah Watershed.

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Graduate School Orientation Session

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IMG_20160817_153954

On Wednesday, August 17th, Hood College officially welcomed over 160 students at its Fall 2016 New Graduate Student Orientation. The Graduate School hosted two events on that day, one specifically for international students in the afternoon and a general event for all new graduate students in the evening.  Eight countries were represented at the international student event.

The highlights of the orientation event were welcomes given by Hood’s new Provost, Dr. Debbie Ricker and Dean of the Graduate School, Dr April Boulton.  Graduate Student Association President Maura Page also brought greetings and the staff of the Beneficial-Hodson Library provided an overview of services. Between the events, students could take tours of the campus as well as talk with representatives of local businesses, including several banks and TransIT of Frederick.

The day ended with students meeting with their specific program directors over dinner.

We wish all our new students a successful academic experience.

Helpful resources can be found Helpful Information for New Students.

Additional pictures from these events are available on our Facebook page.

Below the links for the presentations:

International Graduate Student Orientation PowerPoint

New Student Orientation PowerPoint

 

International Management Class at the Saudi Cultural Mission

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Hood’s International Management class was excited to attend a presentation at the Saudi Arabian Embassy. “We had a cultural experience that included traditional Saudi food, a display of the country’s monuments and buildings, and traditional Saudi clothing. After a presentation on modern Saudi Arabia, we were able to engage in constructive discussion about the place of women in the society, and how men and women can interact within the Saudi borders. During a fashion show, members of the audience, including Camille Pateau, Professor La Fleur and myself, dressed in traditional Saudi garb and were taught the history of dress in the country. After dinner, we socialized with and got to know our hosts.” -MJ Swicegood, MBA candidateFOR_2302

Student Works with NASA this Summer

Posted by | Environmental Biology, Geographic Information Systems, Graduate School Highlights | No Comments

IMG_90722Jared Tomlin, C’16, a Masters of Science in environmental biology candidate, is working with NASA this summer on a project focused on ecological forecasting.

Tomlin is conducting work as a participant in the NASA DEVELOP Program, which is a part of NASA’s Applied Sciences Program and operates at 13 locations throughout the nation. Tomlin’s project team is working at NASA Goddard Space and Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and partnering with the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey to monitor and forecast the abundance and distribution of invasive brome grasses in the Northern Plateau.

The brome grasses impair the area’s native grasslands and contribute to a decrease in native species diversity. Understanding the behavior of the invasive species through space and time is key in developing successful management efforts.

“The program functions to give partner organizations, such as the National Park Service, the ability to better understand complex, landscape level environmental questions for decision making by utilizing the constellation of Earth observing NASA satellites, tools and operational support,” he said.

In addition to the years of field data collected by scientists in the area, the job requires the use of Landsat and Terra satellites, both part of NASA’s Earth observations fleet.

Tomlin earned a certificate in geographic information systems from Hood College in May, making him well equipped for the position. The selection process for participants in the DEVELOP program is considered highly competitive.

“Attending the Hood job fair with a résumé in hand to talk to the DEVELOP representative gave me a start, and my adviser was key in helping navigate the process,” he said. “A strong GPA with a background in GIS and Earth sciences, as well as technical ability in programming and design, were key in my acceptance.”

Tomlin learned about many different GIS and remote sensing solutions throughout his GIS course work, and he maintained a focus on environmental biology and climate change.

“The education I received at Hood College was paramount,” he said.

Before pursuing graduate studies at Hood, Tomlin attended Shepherdstown University in West Virginia, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental science and sustainability. He plans to continue his education to earn a doctorate and go on to work at NASA or a similar organization.

Internationally Known Thanatologist to Speak at Hood College

Posted by | Gerontology, Graduate School Highlights, Human Sciences, Thanatology | No Comments
Dr. Neimeyer

Dr. Neimeyer

Robert A. Neimeyer, Ph.D., will be the featured speaker for the Friday, April 1, 2016 program of the Dana G. Cable Memorial Thanatology Lecture Series. The internationally respected thanatologist will also conduct a workshop on Saturday, April 2, 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. His topic will be contemporary understandings of grieving as a meaning-making process and what it implies for individuals and families.

Both events are open to the public and free of charge. The lecture will be held in Rosenstock Hall’s Hodson Auditorium. To register for the workshop, which will take place at Hodson Science and Technology Center, Room 131, email psychologyrsvp@hood.edu.

Dr. Neimeyer is a Professor in the Department of Psychology, University of Memphis, where he also maintains an active clinical practice. Since completing his doctoral training at the University of Nebraska in 1982, he has published 30 books, including Techniques of Grief Therapy: Creative Practices for Counseling the Bereaved and Grief and the Expressive Arts:  Practices for Creating Meaning (with Barbara Thompson). Dr. Neimeyer serves as Editor of the journal Death Studies and has authored nearly 500 articles and book chapters.

Find out more about Hood’s thanatology certificate and master’s degree programs.

Thanatology Program Holds Death Cafe

Posted by | Gerontology, Graduate School Highlights, Human Sciences, Thanatology | No Comments

Recently, the Graduate School at Hood College’s Thanatology program hosted a Death Cafe for the greater Frederick community. The Saturday event–attended by 41 individuals ranging from hospice volunteers, a physician, and a death doula–spent the morning enjoying refreshments while discussing death. The objective was to increase awareness of death with a view of helping people make the most of their finite lives.

The group talked about right to die legislation, death anxiety, young individuals’ changing views of death and other death-related topics. Facilitators included thanatology program graduates Bunny O’Dell and Elsie Weinstein and current students Emily Fair, Paula Grant and Beverly Rollins.

Find out more about Hood’s thanatology certificate and master’s degree programs.